Adrenaline: A Bowhunter’s Moment of Truth

Lifestyle

You’ve been pursuing an animal for days and all of a sudden it’s in front of you. Your heartbeat quickens, your palms get sweaty, your breathing is erratic, and your stomach flip-flops. This is an adrenaline rush experienced during close encounters with game animals.

Adrenaline is released into the body during times of fear, stress and excitement. For example, when you’re riding a rollercoaster, you’ll probably feel a surge of adrenaline. Hunters feel a surge of adrenaline when they’re about to take a shot or when an animal gets within range. Adrenaline causes the heart rate to increase, breathing to become irregular, and pupils to dilate.

Hunters feel a surge of adrenaline when they’re about to take a shot or when an animal gets within range. Photo Credit: John Hafner Photography

Hunters feel a surge of adrenaline when they’re about to take a shot or when an animal gets within range. Photo Credit: John Hafner Photography

TIPS TO HELP LESSEN THE EFFECTS OF AN ADRENALINE RUSH:

  1. Focus on your breathing. Breathe deeply and slowly and develop a rhythm.
  2. Keep your body relaxed. Try to reduce tension in muscles throughout your body. This will make it easier to draw your bow and hold it steady while aiming and shooting.
  3. Focus on the spot you want your arrow to hit. Concentrate on a small spot to tune out distractions, such as the size of the animal.
  4. After shooting, check the time. Wait at least 30 minutes until you descend from your tree stand or leave your ground blind. Work to restore or maintain the breathing rhythm you had before the shot. Close your eyes, relax and review the shot. Try to visualize everything at the instant you released the arrow. How did the animal react? What direction did the animal go?
  5. Plan your blood trailing moves. Do not hurry from your tree stand or ground blind. Focus on doing this safely. This helps prevent injuries, since you might still be dealing with the effects of the adrenaline surge.
To help lessen the effects of an adrenaline rush, wait at least 30 minutes after shooting to descend from your tree stand or leave your ground blind. Photo Credit: John Hafner Photography

To help lessen the effects of an adrenaline rush, wait at least 30 minutes after shooting to descend from your tree stand or leave your ground blind. Photo Credit: John Hafner Photography

Wanna Give Bowhunting a Try?

If you’re looking to source your own meat and would love to give bowhunting a try, here are a few ways to get started:

  1. Check out Archery 360’s “Intro to Archery.” You’ll get a quick introduction to different types of bows and how to shoot.
  1. Read the basic on where to hunt.
  1. Now that you’re armed with enough knowledge to ask serious questions, find a bowhunting shop in your community and talk to an expert, get some instruction and meet likeminded people.

 


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