4 Tips For Using A Climber Stand

Bowhunting Featured

The climber treestand is a mobile bowhunter’s best friend. It’s packable, lightweight, and allows you to leave cumbersome climbing sticks and ladders at home. Bowhunters ascend to their perch by locking the seat of their climber treestand into the tree and lifting their legs to raise the platform as they climb. Because of this unique method, climber treestand use is limited to specific trees. Here’s what you need to look for when finding the ideal tree.

Branches

Be sure to choose a tree without double trunks or excessive branches. If you’re hunting an area where cutting branches is allowed, pack a handsaw to trim small branches that would otherwise prevent access. Photo Credit: John Hafner

Branches create an obstacle for climber treestands, so choose a tree without double trunks or excessive branches. If you’re hunting an area where cutting branches is allowed, pack a handsaw to trim small branches that would otherwise prevent access. Although this limitation makes finding the ideal tree a challenge, climber treestands make up for it with how quickly they can scale bare trees

Cover

treestand

Deer and other game animals have a difficult time looking into the sun. As long as the sun is at your back, your odds of being spotted decrease. Photo Credit: John Hafner

Eliminating trees with lots of branches means you’ll likely stick out like a sore thumb. Avoid this problem by choosing trees in clusters. This will also break up your outline and prevent you from being silhouetted. If additional cover isn’t available, note the direction of the sun. Deer and other game animals have a difficult time looking into the sun. As long as the sun is at your back, your odds of being spotted decrease.

Size

If the tree is roughly the same width as your shoulders, climb away! If the tree is significantly smaller or larger than your shoulders, it likely won’t work. Photo Credit: John Hafner

Tall, straight trees are tailor-made for climber treestands. Trees that lean or curve are challenging and unsafe to climb. Look for trees that are 16 to 24 inches in diameter. A quick method to judge a tree’s diameter is to compare it to your shoulders. If the tree is roughly the same width as your shoulders, climb away! If the tree is significantly smaller or larger than your shoulders, it likely won’t work. Smaller trees blow in the wind and won’t support you, while larger trees prevent the treestand from locking into a stable position.

Type

treestand

With practice, you’ll set-up much faster in a climber than any other type of treestand. Consider adding this effective tool to your hunting arsenal. Photo Credit: John Hafner

As you know, not all trees are created equal. Aspen or birch trees have very smooth bark that makes it difficult for the treestand to lock into place. Oaks and maples are ideal, because they’re sturdy and have soft bark to secure the treestand. Pine trees, specifically white pine, produce a lot of sap that will cover your stand and make things very sticky. For that reason avoid hanging your treestand in pines.

Although climber treestands require specific trees, they more than make up for their limitations with their mobility. With practice, you’ll set-up much faster in a climber than any other type of treestand. Consider adding this effective tool to your hunting arsenal.


Find A Store
We found a store near